Friday, June 28, 2013

Innovation: Rustoleum NeverWet

A friend of mine posted the below video on Facebook the other day. It is a demonstration of a new product from Rustoleum called "NeverWet." It is a spray on product that seems to create a nonporous and slick barrier, causing liquids of all sorts to simply slide off. Check out the video below for more details.


After watching the video, it got me thinking about potential automotive applications. Currently, the best way to protect your car's paint is to wax it after washing. While wax does a fairly decent job of protecting paint from dirt and liquids, it mainly causes liquids to simply bead up, leaving the job of removing the water off the car up to you. Thicker, stickier liquids, like tree sap, still have a tendency to cling to wax, meaning you would have to wash and reapply the wax to get rid of it. The other problem with wax is that in order for it to properly protect your vehicle, it must be applied on a fairly regular basis. Not everyone is going to have time to properly and regularly wax their vehicle.

What if there was a spray on product that could supplement your wax by repelling all sorts of liquids? How cool would it be to watch rain, mud, and all forms of dirty liquids simply roll off the hood of your car? Rustoleum's "NeverWet" certainly has the potential to be that product. From the video above, it seems to work on all sorts of surfaces, such as textiles, smooth plastic, glass surfaces, and even concrete bricks. The only noticeable problem with "NeverWet" is that once applied, it does leave a rough texture on whatever it was applied to. If Rustoluem could find a way to smooth out the end application, and find a way to mix it with automotive wax, then you could potentially have a product that would keep your vehicle cleaner longer. Another potential application is to mix the product with the clear coat that is applied to cars as the last step of the automotive painting process. Car gets dirty? No problem. Just spray it down with water and watch all the dirt and grime simply slide off the car with the water. A solution like this could potentially save time, money, and water for the DIY car care types.

After watching the video, what do you guys think? Could a product like this see a potential automotive application? Could you see it being used for something else like motorcycles? Let me know what you think in the comments below.